A personal view on the process of becoming mature

Weiler, in collaboration with Stephen C. Weiler in collaboration Stephen C. Weiler and Stephen C. Used with permission of Paulist Press.

A personal view on the process of becoming mature

A personal view on the process of becoming mature

Various theorists have provided frameworks for recognizing the indicators of maturity. Erikson's stages of psychosocial development describe progression into adult maturity, with each maturational stage characterized by a certain kind of psychsocial conflict. Adolescents navigate a web of conflicting values and selves in order to emerge as 'the person one has come to be' and 'the person society expects one to become'.

While maturity is often termed as a label awarded to a child, research has revealed that children themselves hold a clear sense of their own autonomy and personal jurisdiction.

For instance, American elementary-aged school children demonstrated an acknowledgement of the limits of their parents' authority over their choice of dress, hairstyle, friends, hobbies, and media choices. Biological and evolutionary markers[ edit ] Where maturity is an earned status that often carries responsibilities, immaturity is then defined in contrast by the absence of serious responsibility and in its place is the freedom for unmitigated growth.

In infancy, motor development stretches long into the early years of life, necessitating that young infants rely on their mothers almost entirely.

This state of helplessness provides for an intensely close bond between infant and mother, where separation is infrequent and babies are rarely out of a caregiver's arms.

Human children, on the other hand, do not have an advanced motor control capable of foraging and also lack the digestive capacity for unprepared food, and so have always relied on the active involvement of their mother and other caregivers in their care into childhood.

The incomplete development of this process contributes to the finding that adolescents use their brain less broadly than do adults when asked to inhibit a response and show less cross-talk communication across diverse regions of the brain. The age of majoritythe most broadly applied legal threshold of adulthood, is typically characterized by recognition of control over oneself and one's actions and decisions.

The most common age threshold is 18 years of age, with thresholds ranging from 14 to 21 across nations and between provinces. Although age of majority is referred to as a jurisdiction's legal age, the legal ages of various other issues of legal maturity like sexual consent or drinking and smoking ages are often different from the age of majority.

A personal view on the process of becoming mature

Aside from age-based thresholds of maturity, restrictions based in a perceived intellectual immaturity also extend to those with a variety of mental impairments generally defined as anyone with a mental disability that requires guardianshipwith laws in place in most regions limiting the voting rights of the mentally disabled and often requiring the judgment of a court to declare fitness.

Similar to those restrictions placed on children, persons with mental disabilities also have freedoms restricted and have their rights assigned to parental guardians. One reason cited for why children and the mentally disabled are not permitted to vote in elections is that they are too intellectually immature to understand voting issues.

This view is echoed in concerns about the adult voting population, with observers citing concern for a decrease in 'civic virtue' and 'social capital,' reflecting a generalized panic over the political intelligence of the voting population.

On the whole, this view is unsubstantiated, with interviews with youth revealing that they often have a great deal of knowledge about news programming, media bias, the importance of evidence, evaluation of arguments on the merits of their evidence, as well as a preparedness for forming arguments of one's own using available evidence.

In cognitive research, some studies conducted in the s offered a skeptical view of adolescent understanding of democratic principles like freedom of speech. More recent research [13] [27] has unveiled that even elementary school age children have a concept of freedom of speech and that by ages 8—9 this concept expands beyond a concern for personal autonomy and onto awareness for its social implications and the importance of the right to a political voice.

Maturity has also been taken into account when determining the fairness of the death penalty in cases involving mentally retarded or underage perpetrators. Supreme Court decision banning the execution of mentally retarded persons, was decided on the grounds that "diminished capacities to understand and process mistakes and learn from experience, to engage in logical reasoning, to control impulses, and to understand the reactions of others" was cited as the evidence supporting a reduced view of criminal culpability.

Traditionally, this ceremony awarded adult legal rights as well as the right to marry. Similarly, Christian churches hold Confirmation as a rite of passage in early adolescence. In all churches, of age Christians are responsible for going to church on Sundays and for confessing their sins periodically; within certain denominations it is also a common practice to warn children that it would be a mortal sin an act punishable by banishment to hell to lapse in these responsibilities.

Prom is celebrated throughout many countries of the world following or prior to final coursework for the year or after graduation. Various parties, ceremonies, or gatherings are held, ranging in their focus on academics, bonding, or as a farewell. In some Western European countries a post-degree party consists of burning notebooks and final projects.

In certain countries, such as Colombia and the United States, the prom has come to take on a dual role of celebrating both academic achievement as well as sexual maturity. A number of traditions are associated with the earlier critical maturation point of menarche.

A girl's menarche is commemorated in varying ways, with some traditional Jewish customs defining it as a contamination, with the customs shaped around cleaning it away and ensuring it does not make anything or one unclean.personal relations contributes to the development of group cohesion.

It is during this stage of development (assuming the group gets this far) that people begin to experience a sense of group belonging and a feeling of.

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Mar 11,  · And they have defended the process as a kind of Saudi-style plea bargain in which settlements were reached to avoid the time and economic disruption of a drawn-out legal process.

Learn more about how Principal can help you plan for whatever events, milestones, or changes happen in your life. Sep 26,  · How to Be Mature. In this Article: Article Summary Developing Mature Behaviors Developing Emotional Maturity Communicating Like an Adult Being Courteous Community Q&A Maturity is more than a matter of age.

There are mature 6-year-olds and immature year-olds. Maturity is a matter of how you treat yourself and others%(). The dying process usually begins well before death actually occurs, and understanding this process can sometimes help you recognize when your loved one is dying.

There are changes that take place physically, behaviorally, and psychologically in the journey towards death, that are signs that the end of life may be nearing. Personal values, belief and attitudes As human beings, we all have our own values, beliefs and attitudes that we have developed throughout the course of our lives.

Our family, friends, community and the experiences we have had all contribute to our sense of who we are and how we view the world.

Spiritual Maturity: Steps to Growing as a Disciple of Christ